Parvovirus B19 - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology

What is parvovirus B19 (Slapped cheek disease/5th disease)? Parvovirus B19 is the smallest known DNA animal virus, coming in at an itty bitty 18 to 28 nanometers in diameter. Find our complete video library only on Osmosis Prime: http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.

Parvovirus B19

Subscribe to this channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKDwY2bhQtcMUZ3UFdN3Mng?sub_confirmation=1 Other Infectious Disease Lectures: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfBFwAwues0nUpkmeLncvvUV315dXVo4o Primate erythroparvovirus 1, generally referred to as B19 virus, parvovirus B19 or sometimes erythrovirus B19, was the first (and until 2005 the only) known human virus in the family Parvoviridae, genus Erythroparvovirus; it measures only 23–26 nm in diameter. The name is derived from Latin, parvum meaning small, reflecting the fact that B19 ranks among the smallest DNA viruses. B19 virus is most known for causing disease in the pediatric population; however, it can also affect adults. It is the classic cause of the childhood rash called fifth disease or erythema infectiosum, or "slapped cheek syndrome". The virus was discovered by chance in 1975 by Australian virologist Yvonne Cossart. It gained its name because it was discovered in well B19 of a large series of microtiter plates. Erythroviruses belong to the Parvoviridae family of small DNA viruses. It is a non-enveloped, icosahedral virus that contains a single-stranded linear DNA genome. The infectious particles may contain either positive or negative strands of DNA. The icosahedral capsid consists of two structural proteins, VP1 (83 kDa) and VP2 (58 kDa), which are identical except for 227 amino acids at the amino-terminal of the VP1-protein, the so-called VP1-unique region. Each capsid consists of a total of 60 capsomers: VP2 is the major capsid protein, and comprises approximately 95% of the total virus particle. VP1-proteins are incorporated into the capsid structure in a non-stochiometrical relation (based on antibody-binding analysis and X-ray structural analysis the VP1-unique region is assumed to be exposed at the surface of the virus particle. At each end of the DNA molecule there are palindromic sequences which form "hairpin" loops. The hairpin at the 3' end serves as a primer for the DNA polymerase. It is classified as erythrovirus because of its capability to invade red blood cell precursors in the bone marrow. Three genotypes (with subtypes) have been recognised. The Nucleotide substitution rate for total coding DNA has been estimated to be 1.03 (0.6-1.27) x 10−4 substitutions/site/year. This rate is similar to that of other single stranded DNA viruses. VP2 codons were found to be under purifying selection. In contrast VP1 codons in the unique part of the gene were found to be under diversifying selection. This diversifying selection is consistent with persistent infection as this part of the VP1 protein contains epitopes recognised by the immnune system. Like other nonenveloped DNA viruses, pathogenicity of parvovirus B19 involves binding to host cell receptors, internalization, translocation of the genome to the host nucleus, DNA replication, RNA transcription, assembly of capsids and packaging of the genome, and finally cell lysis with release of the mature virions. In humans the P antigen (also known as globoside) is the cellular receptor for parvovirus B19 virus that causes Erythema infectiosum (fifth disease) in children. This infection is sometimes complicated by severe aplastic anemia caused by lysis of early erythroid precursors. The virus is primarily spread by infected respiratory droplets; blood-borne transmission, however, has been reported. The secondary attack risk for exposed household persons is about 50%, and about half of that for classroom contacts. At the moment, there are no treatments that directly target Parvovirus B19 virus. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIG) therapy has been a popular alternative because doctors can administer it without stopping chemotherapy drugs like MEL-ASCT. Also, the treatment's side effects are rare as only 4 out of 133 patients had complications (2 had acute renal failure and 2 had pulmonary edema) even though 69 of the patients had organ transplants and 39 of them were HIV positive. This is a large improvement over administering Rituximab. The monoclonal antibody against the CD20 protein has been shown to cause acute hepatitis, neutropenia via Parvovirus B19 reactivations, and even persistent Parvovirus B19 infection. However, it is important to note that IVIG therapy is not perfect as 34% of treated patients will have a relapse after 4 months. more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parvovirus_B19

Rubéole et l'infection par le parvovirus B19

#rubeole #parvovirus B19 #infection_et_grossesse, ecn,maladies infectieuses

12DaysinMarch, Parvovirus B19 for USMLE Step One

Howard Sachs, MD is developer of the 12DaysinMarch lecture series. He is Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and teaches an integrated review of Organ Systems during the first 12 days in March. His focus is USMLE Step One preparation based on robust feedback from some of the greatest medical students in the nation.

O que posso esperar durante um teste de IgG Parvovirus B19 ? ?

Este é um dos meus vídeos sobre uma ampla gama de recursos educacionais para garantir que informações vitais para médicos, pacientes e famílias estejam disponíveis e sejam facilmente acessíveis onde e quando for necessário. Ajude seus pacientes ou entes queridos a descobrir esse vídeo e confie que eles têm acesso a um recurso educacional on-line autorizado e oportuno. Este vídeo ajuda a descobrir os segredos deste tópico de saúde, respondendo a quaisquer perguntas que você possa ter, especialmente se você for um paciente recém-diagnosticado à procura de mais informações sobre uma doença e sobre as opções de tratamento. Eu criei muitos vídeos fornecendo informações sobre diagnóstico, tratamento, efeitos colaterais e efeitos psicossociais de várias condições de saúde, ajudando as pessoas a identificar as especificidades de seu diagnóstico individual e plano de tratamento.

Management of TORCH infections during pregnancy

Presented By: Tiziana Lazzarotto - Professor of Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology at Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna (Italy) Laboratory of Virology of the Operative Unit of Microbiology at St. Orsola Malpighi Speaker Biography: Tiziana Lazzarotto is Professor of Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology, Department of Specialised, Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, School of Medicine and Surgery at Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna (Italy). She is the Head of the Laboratory of Virology at the Operative Unit of Clinical Microbiology at St. Orsola Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna. She is the Director of the Post-graduate school in Microbiology and Virology at Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna (Italy). Webinar: Management of TORCH infections during pregnancy Webinar Abstract: This webinar will provide an overview on some pathogens that can be transmitted from mother to fetus during pregnancy (prenatal infections) or delivery (perinatal infections). The most prevalent prenatal infections include: cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, rubella virus and Toxoplasma gondii; the perinatal infections include Herpes Simplex Virus 1-2. All these pathogens belong to the TORCH complex and can lead to severe fetal/neonatal anomalies or even loss of life. This webinar will review the state of congenital TORCH infections, including incidence, importance of early detection, diagnosis, and disease management. Most infections in the mother are asymptomatic and/or accompanied by aspecific symptoms and/or aspecific laboratory findings, as a result clinical diagnosis is unreliable. Therefore, today, viro-microbiological laboratory techniques represent a decisive approach in the management of TORCH infections in pregnancy. Learning Objectives: -To review the epidemiology and burden of these infectious diseases in pregnancy and newborns -To illustrate the setting of the collaborative diagnostic and clinical pathway for the management of infections in pregnant women and newborns -To outline the advantages and limitations of the viro-microbiological - diagnosis -To describe the measures of prevention and therapy of these infections. Earn PACE Credits: 1. Make sure you’re a registered member of LabRoots (https://www.labroots.com/ms/webinar/management-torch-infections-pregnancy) 2. Watch the webinar on YouTube or on the LabRoots Website (https://www.labroots.com/ms/webinar/management-torch-infections-pregnancy) 3. Click Here to get your PACE credits (Expiration date – October 16, 2020 06:00 AM): https://www.labroots.com/credit/pace-credits/3014/third-party LabRoots on Social: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LabRootsInc Twitter: https://twitter.com/LabRoots LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/labroots Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/labrootsinc Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/labroots/ SnapChat: labroots_inc

Parvovirus B19

Se hace una descripción del Parvovirus B19, así como de la quinta enfermedad o eritema infeccioso, hablamos un poco de las mejillas abofeteadas y del abordaje clínico que le daremos DALE LIKE Y SUSCRÍBETE VISITA MIS REDES SOCIALES: FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/rcfmed

They Thought I had Lupus, my Parvovius B-19 Story

For a health update, almost 16 months post diagnosis, check out this video: https://youtu.be/OxvUOt5l054 In this video (sorry its so terribly long) I will tell you about my experience in December and January. This is the sickest I have ever been and it was so scary. The Parvo virus also caused a lot of other problems including pericarditis and joint inflammation. The doctors were telling me I had Lupus or Rheumatoid Arthritis. I'm hoping this video may help someone else. it is horrible feeling this awful but not knowing why.

À quoi puis je m'attendre lors d'un test igg de parvovirus b19

Nos vidéos sont destinées à un public averti de patients et de professionnels de la santé. Elles s’assurent à partir d’études fondées sur des preuves et examinées par des pairs, ainsi que de contenus impartiaux, précis et informatifs émanant de sociétés médicales, d’organisations gouvernementales (par exemple, la FDA, les NIH, CDC, NHS), collèges royaux, groupes de patients, associations professionnelles, entre autres. Les vidéos offrent des informations crédibles, gratuites et complètes sur la prévention et le dépistage des maladies, le diagnostic, le traitement et la recherche. Nos vidéos contiennent des informations émanant d'experts et de personnes réelles sur divers problèmes de santé. Elles répondent à la plupart de vos questions, notamment sur ce qui s'est passé, sur ce que vous ressentez, sur ce que vous pouvez faire à ce sujet et sur son importance.

B19 virus

B19 virus

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