The myth of the "supermale" and the extra Y chromosome

In the 1960s and 1970s geneticists pursued a fascinating hypothesis: Is it possible that a man could be born with a criminal gene? For more: http://www.vox.com/2015/2/25/8103965/genetics-crime-xyy Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Produced & narrated by Estelle Caswell Vox.com is news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

What is Turner Syndrome? Animated Explanation Video

A simple animation explaining what Turner Syndrome is, how it is caused, the symptoms, and how it is diagnosed and treated. We hope this video will be useful to you and those around you. UPDATE: Now including subtitles in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Japanese, Russian and Spanish. Thank you to Trommons Translators and The Rosetta Foundation for providing the translations. HealthSketch is a project set up by a group of UK junior doctors to convey health information in visually engaging ways, empowering us all to lead healthier lives. For more information, please visit: Website: http://www.health-sketch.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/health_sketch Facebook: http://facebook.com/healthsketch Whiteboard Animation by Russ Law: russ@russlaw.co.uk All content, including graphics, audio, text, and links, is for information and education purposes only. This video should not be considered a substitute for professional medical care, so if you have further questions or concerns, please consult a medical professional. This video was created for The Turner Syndrome Support Society. You can find more information about Turner Syndrome at their website - http://tss.org.uk

XYY Syndrome

A shor video about XYY Syndrome

Introduction of my life with XXY Klinefelter Syndrome

My name is Gerald I found out 2yrs ago when I was 32 that I had XXY chromosomes also known as Klinefelter Syndrome. I do my best to explain a little about myself and what I go through stay tuned for more videos. Thanks for watching

The XYY Controversy

This is an excerpt from the book entitled "Elohim the Archetype (Original) Pattern of the Universe" Written by Dr. Henry Clifford Kinley. This excerpt explains the mystery behind the XYY chromosomal makeup and it's spiritual significance according to the 3-fold Tabernacle Pattern. Narrated by Yahshuans Giving Glory

Living with Klinefelter Syndrome

Hi My name is Matt and I am 47,XXY Klinefelter Syndrome, bellow I have listed from a website to teach you my friends and family about what I go through on a daily basis but some of these symptoms I don’t have so ill have in brackets after the symptom a yes or a no & maybe a little explanation How common is Klinefelter's syndrome? Between 1 in 500 and 1 in 1,000 boys are born with KS. What are the symptoms of Klinefelter's syndrome? KS is usually not noticed until you go through puberty. Puberty may be late or incomplete if you have KS. Sometimes the condition may only be diagnosed if you are investigated for infertility as an adult. The typical features of KS in an adult are: Small testes. (yes but that does not mean I have small genitals a lot of people when they look up my syndrome they assume that I have a small penis and frankly that upsets me that people are that shallow) Decreased facial hair compared to a usual male. (yes I can not grow a beard properly) Gynaecomastia (some breast tissue development). (no I do not have man boobs lol) Decreased pubic hair compared to a usual male. (yes and I love the fact that I have hardly any body hair) A tall, thin body with disproportionately long arms and legs. ( No I am short 5'6") Obesity - this may cause a thicker waistline but it is often partially disguised by wider than normal hips. (No I have a normal male body shape) Children and adolescents with KS may also have: A delay in the age of first walking. (yes I started walking very late) Dyspraxia (which causes co-ordination problems). (Yes as a child I couldn’t catch a ball) Speech and language delay or difficulties. (No) Attention problems. (yes) Mild learning disabilities. (Yes) Dyslexia or reading problems. (No) Behavioural problems - boys tend to be shy and have low self-confidence; they may appear to be immature when compared to their peers. (yes as a child not as an adult) In adulthood, in addition to the main typical features: You may also have problems getting an erection and have a low libido (sex drive). (No I have a high Sex Drive) Anxiety and depression may be a problem. (yes but Depression is caused by many other factors) 'Thin bones' (osteoporosis) may develop in young or middle age rather than the usual older age for this condition. (Yes I have osteopenia) You may also be less muscular than other men. (yes) Most men who are 47, XXY have normal intelligence. However, your intelligence may be affected if you have a higher number of X chromosomes. (ha-ha I found this one quite funny so are they saying the women gene X is dumb) Almost all men who are 47, XXY will be infertile. (Yes)

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XXXY (2000) (HD)

Release date: 2000 Studio: Stanford University, Department of Art & Art History facebook.com/xxdocxy interfaceproject.org Description "This is the finest film on the issues of intersex Americans, and an indispensable tool for instructors of Human Sexuality, Gender Identity, and Social Psychology. The film calls into question the ethics of American pediatrics as well as our fixation on whether a baby is a boy or a girl. The film not only sheds light on a shamefully neglected topic, but is a siren call to end the barbaric and totally unnecessary cosmetic surgeries on the genitals of American intersex infants." -- Winston Wilde, Prof. of Human Sexuality and Behavioral Sciences, Santa Monica College "At only 13 minutes long, Porter Gale and Laleh Soomekh's documentary, XXXY, is essential filmmaking. A look at people born with ambiguous genitalia who had the grave misfortune of having their sex surgically decided for them as infants, the film concisely and powerfully conveys horror, injustice and tremendous personal fortitude. And it does all this through its straightforward cinematic visit with 25-year-old Kristi and clinical psychologist Howard Devore, two individuals who endured the experience themselves. The film's stripped down quality — talking heads, the occasional shot of a childhood home, or Kristi on a bike — means there's nothing to interfere with the pair's stories; the impact is profound. Plenty of others thought so too; after a successful international festival run, the film was awarded a student Academy Award gold medal." --Filmmaker Magazine, 2000 "The most fascinating documentary, and my pick for overall winner, is XXXY (which consists of interviews with two intersex people). The film points out that 1 in 2000 people is born with genitalia neither completely male nor completely female, and the film examines the pressure the medical community puts on intersex people and their parents to undergo surgery to fit them into a male or a female mold. The film, although at times a little too distant, is effective because it avoids cloying sentimentality and focuses clearly on a specific aspect of its subjects without avoiding other issues." --Fred Choi, MIT Tech, June 8, 2001, PlanetOut.com's Second Queer Short Film Festival Plot Outline "...the 13-minute film XXXY by Porter Gale and Laleh Soomekh. This emotionally gripping short film centers on two people who were born intersex—Kristi, a bike messenger, and Howard, a clinical psychologist. Their stories share the common pain of being raised after having undergone corrective genital surgery as children. Fighting against a world in which doctors make arbitrary choices about children's sex and gender, independent of their parents, Kristi and Howard relate the horrors of adolescence and adulthood when one is "not wholly male or female." Kristi, who was born XY (male) but was raised as a girl, sums up the confusion and pain of hermaphrodite individuals when she says, "I'm not a girl. Stop treating me like I am!" --The Harvard Crimson, April 27, 2001 Awards Winner-2001 Student Academy Awards, Best Documentary Finalist-PlanetOut.com Gay & Lesbian Online Movie Awards Western Psychological Assn. honoree New York EXPOsition of Short Film and Video Jury Award Palm Springs Shorts Film Festival Award Louisville Film and Video Festival honoree, San Francisco Gay and Lesbian Intl. Film Festival honoree Selected for screening at more than a dozen international film festivals

What are Barr bodies?

A Barr body (named after discoverer Murray Barr) is the inactive X chromosome in a female somatic cell, rendered inactive in a process called lyonization, in those species in which sex is determined by the presence of the Y (including humans) or W chromosome rather than the diploidy of the X or Z. The Lyon hypothesis states that in cells with multiple X chromosomes, all but one are inactivated during mammalian embryogenesis. This happens early in embryonic development at random in mammals, except in marsupials and in some extra-embryonic tissues of some placental mammals, in which the father's X chromosome is always deactivated. In men and women with more than one X chromosome, the number of Barr bodies visible at interphase is always one less than the total number of X chromosomes. For example, men with a 47,XXY karyotype have a single Barr body, whereas women with a 47,XXX karyotype have two Barr bodies. Barr bodies can be seen on the nucleus of neutrophils. Mechanism A typical human female has only one Barr body per somatic cell, while a typical human male has none. Mammalian X-chromosome inactivation is initiated from the X inactivation centre or Xic, usually found near the centromere. The center contains twelve genes, seven of which code for proteins, five for untranslated RNAs, of which only two are known to play an active role in the X inactivation process, Xist and Tsix. The centre also appears to be important in chromosome counting: ensuring that random inactivation only takes place when two or more X-chromosomes are present. The provision of an extra artificial Xic in early embryogenesis can induce inactivation of the single X found in male cells. The roles of Xist and Tsix appear to be antagonistic. The loss of Tsix expression on the future inactive X chromosome results in an increase in levels of Xist around the Xic. Meanwhile, on the future active X Tsix levels are maintained; thus the levels of Xist remain low.This shift allows Xist to begin coating the future inactive chromosome, spreading out from the Xic. In non-random inactivation this choice appears to be fixed and current evidence suggests that the maternally inherited gene may be imprinted. It is thought that this constitutes the mechanism of choice, and allows downstream processes to establish the compact state of the Barr body. These changes include histone modifications, such as histone H3 methylation and histone H2A ubiquitination,as well as direct modification of the DNA itself, via the methylation of CpG sites. These changes help inactivate gene expression on the inactive X-chromosome and to bring about its compaction to form the Barr body.

Secrets of the X chromosome - Robin Ball

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/secrets-of-the-x-chromosome-robin-ball The sequence of DNA that we inherit from our parents encodes directions for making our cells and giving us specific traits. Identical twins have the same DNA sequence, so how can one twin end up with a genetic disorder while the other twin does not? Robin Ball explains how the secret lies in X chromosome inactivation. Lesson by Robin Ball, animation by Anton Trofimov.

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